Pros

If you’re looking for good restraint bondage rope and enjoy using knots, this is probably what you should go for. Again, not recommended for shibari, but everything else goes, and I’ve heard that there are actually dyes which will change the colour of nylon. Mine certainly have: I went from feeling “so-so” about hemp to loving it, just by getting a different supplier. I hope this post was useful for people wanting to learn about the different types of rope! Pro: Nylon and MFP takes dye very well, resulting in brilliant color. Con: Poly pro or mixed material does not take color well or consistently. Jute makes for extremely good photos in it’s un-dyed state. It generally has very clean lines, and has a sort of compelling aesthetic to it which honestly can make a person fall in love with it. Pros:. It’s easily accessible; cheaper than most bondage ropes, it has decent tooth (essentially, friction; what holds your knots and stuff together), it’s washable, and it’s decently strong.

Answered the whole question, just like that. And wasn’t it just frustrating as hell? Pro: Better “tooth”, so it grabs better and takes fewer knots to hold securely. Pro: Preferred for suspension as it doesn’t stretch as much and has more consistent stretch characteristics. This is actually a hollow braid kind of rope; meaning it’s a polypropylene braid wrapped around a core of something. I found it at a Bunnings Warehouse.

Which is fantastic! It’s always great to have some idea of exactly how much your rope can take. For our purposes though, what’s great about this bondage rope is the way it feels. Hemp is one of the natural fibre ropes that is commonly used for shibari. It’s generally pricier than anything synthetic, and my understanding is that it’s used a lot over in the US. However, as I examined it, I realized that I could probably remove the core. What was left wouldn’t be as strong, but it might very well be suitable for bedroom tying. Nylon Bondage Rope. I don’t actually own any of this stuff, because I’ve never felt the need.

You can spend ages trying to unpick those things, which leads to swearing and frustration and a general lack of cool. The times when I’ve felt it most likely that I would need to use safety scissors to get someone out of rope, have all been times when I’ve been using this kind of cotton rope. In fact, I’ve seen people exhibit immense frustration over such responses. And to be honest, I’d much rather be helpful. Can be either scratchy or soft, depending on the conditioning process. You can almost see the scratchiness.

Hemp is one of the natural fibre ropes that is commonly used for shibari. It’s generally pricier than anything synthetic, and my understanding is that it’s used a lot over in the US. Knots that look so-so with cotton or synthetic somehow look amazing with jute. It has a sort of liveliness to it. I like green and silver, other people may prefer red and silver, or may be able to shop around online to find a solid colour braid. Reasonably cheap; comes in different diameters and you can get bundles of it for not a bad price, or you can measure off the lengths you want right from the spool. I’ll even include pictures! Aren’t I just the nicest? I’m going to go over the kinds of rope pictured above, from left to right. It also makes things more likely to be itchy, sneezy, etc. Update (2018).